"Quality is the Best Business Plan, Period" and the Low End Dilemma

The quote above comes from John Lasseter, the chief creative officer at Pixar. A similar quote comes from a Jony Ive interview on Apple's product design process: "If it's not very good we should just stop ...." I think these quotes capture why certain companies -- BMW, Mercedes, Porsche, Ferrari, Disney/Pixar, Apple, and so on -- survive and prosper over such a long time period. They consistently focus on delivering a well-designed, high quality product, which leads to a great user experience, a strong brand, and high customer loyalty. These companies all put superior product quality ahead of affordability, allowing them to survive and grow even with limited market share.

Low cost, low end products often lack the quality needed to deliver a great user experience, which leads to disloyal customers who will trade up for a high quality alternative as soon as they can afford it. A college student driving a Ford compact looks forward to the day when he can maybe afford a BMW sedan.

This may explain why Android OEM's are losing business to Apple. It may also explain why low end companies with low margins often seem to disappear, while a few luxury brands survive for decades. In the short run the low end may be appealing, especially from a market share perspective, but in the long run low end customers defect and support the survival of high quality vendors.

The Low End Dilemma

Companies with a low end, modular business model -- that are trying to disrupt incumbents making high quality products that are arguably more than good enough -- face another big challenge: making the meaningful product improvements needed to move upmarket. When a company with a low end disruptive model can't move upmarket, it ends up wallowing in the low end, engaged in unprofitable, price-based competition. See Concepts page and discussion of Clayton Christensen.

This seems like the problem currently faced by many low end Android OEM's. These OEM's are assembling modular components while trying to move upmarket to compete with companies like Apple. The problem is that it's hard to move upmarket -- with meaningful, well-designed product improvements -- with a low end business model premised on cheap, modular components. An integrated competitor focused on high quality rather than price -- like Apple -- is better positioned to make meaningful product improvements (e.g., Apple Pay and Apple's Touch ID) that distance itself from low end, modular assemblers that must rely on superficial improvements to product appearance, components, or features.

This may be why so many Android OEM "improvements" amount to unnecessary changes or features. These changes often add complexity rather than fundamentally improving a product's convenience or ease of use.

The business prospects of a modular low end player that falls too far behind an integrated company making fundamental improvements are not good.

The author owns stock shares of Apple.